Infomaps



Today we have many companies and labs that perform advanced infomapping. Basically infomaps deals with any coherent set of correspondences mapped in a two or three dimensions sensorial schemes, mainly visual. Here below we depict a series of different mappings schemes.





Recommended External Sources




1- Kartoo - Visual Search Facilitator

Kartoo - "les cartes du web". An interesting network metaphor as a visual interface to search engine results. It looks as a nice tool for professional people providing for each query a set of topics, sites, and history of the searching process. When a "node" of the map es activated somehow connected are also iluminated.


2- Web Maps

Two examples of the multi-level information maps from Map.Net, which enable you to browse over 2 million websites from the Open Directory. Each colored tile in the map represents a category of websites, with high profile individual ones shown by the target symbols. The Map.Net system also includes a 3D cityscape view of the Web shown on the information landscapes page. The underlying information mapping technology is called Visual Net and is being developed by Antarcti, Canada.


3- Market Maps

Map of the Market, from SmartMoney.com, maps the stock performance of 500 US corporations. Different plots of land sized according to their market capitalisation represent individual companies. The color of the plot indicates recent changes in stock price. Martin Wattenberg developed it. The market at a glance The map lets you watch more than 500 stocks at once, with data updated every 15 minutes. Each colored rectangle in the map represents an individual company. The rectangle's size reflects the company's market cap and the color shows price performance. (Green means the stock price is up; red means it's down. Dark colors are neutral). Move the mouse over a company rectangle and a little panel will pop up with more information.

For example, the picture at left shows a group of technology companies. The mouse is pointing to a dark rectangle, representing Oracle. Notice that the green rectangle at the upper left is much bigger than the others. Exactly which Redmond-based software behemoth it represents is left as an exercise for the reader.

The visualization used in the Map of the Market derives from work done by Prof. Ben Shneiderman and students at the University of Maryland Human-Computer Interaction Lab on treemap displays.


4- News Maps

It was a demo effort: An information map of global news stories from NewsMaps. The map summaries 121 online news reports from December 13th 1999. NewsMaps was powered by ThemeScape technology from Cartia. Cartia was acquired by Aurigin Systems, Inc. and, unfortunately, NewsMaps is no more. ThemeScape is still available by Aurigin and you may see its past here.


5- Eastern Imagination

Two innovative visualizations of conversations on web-based chat boards, developed by Rebecca Xiong as part of her graduate research at MIT Media Lab. The gif shown here is titled PeopleGarden. The idea is to research conversation patterns trying to answer some typical questions like:

Do participants here really get involved? How much interaction is there? Who are the experts? Do participants here welcome newcomers?

Two examples of the multi-level information maps from Map.Net, which enable you to browse over 2 million websites from the Open Directory. Each colored tile in the map represents a category of websites, with high profile individual ones shown by the target symbols. The Map.Net system also includes a 3D cityscape view of the Web shown on the information landscapes page.


6- Site Maps

This example is SiteMap developed by Xia Lin, Drexel University, maps part of the Web space relating to astronomy and space science as stored in the Yahoo directory. The hierarchical, text listing in Yahoo is transformed into landuse cybermap. The reading routine is as follows (imagine the map framed by scroll bars and small windows depicting menus of the details):


7- Social Patterns Maps

A map of the social patterns of an electronic community produced by Visual Who developed by Judith S. Donath, Media Lab, MIT, USA. The main research lines follows:

The Conversational Interface: hearing range
Each person who is connected to the chat's server appears as a colored circle. Users choose (or are assigned) a color upon logging in and color thus server as a general indicator of identity.

Once a user logs in to Chat Circles, he or she sees all the other participants in the entire system. Nevertheless, the user needs to be physically close to other participants to be able to "listen" to (i.e. to read) their conversation.

Each person in the system has a "hearing range" that allows him or her to engage in conversation only with people who are sufficiently close by. The other users, the ones outside the person's hearing range, maintain their locations and colors but are rendered differently - their circles appear as outlined circles instead of being fully colored and their messages are not displayed.


Conversation Landscape
can be thought of as a two-dimensional model of the conversation, with the y axis representing time. Just like in the conversational interface, each user here is represented by a different color.

The temporal sequence results in colored threads on the screen that, when viewed together, reveal the interaction patterns within a conversation. Each participant's thread displays individual postings as horizontal bars crossing the vertical time line. Single postings can be accessed on the history threads through a mouse-over effect. When the mouse rolls over one of the horizontal bars, the latter becomes highlighted and the corresponding text appears to the right of that particular bar.

The visualization of history in Conversation Landscape also takes into account user movement on the screen as well as the "selective" patterns created by the hearing range feature of the conversational interface. Even though all users' threads are continuously displayed on the screen, one can look at each person's individual interaction history by clicking on - and consequently highlighting - that user's thread. This causes the threads of other users with whom this person interacted to become highlighted as well.


8- Web Searching Match Maps

This example shows a Umap information map. This strange looking image is an interactive map of Web search results. These maps were moved. Now all the research done by UMAP belongs to Trivia.


9- Web Maps

They are a combination of Website maps and News Maps, showing a "topology" with tops and hills resembling a gravitational "Field of Forces", implemented by WebMap. It's interesting to study the effect of hypothetical news over some leading stocks.